google’s virtual reality viewer is ‘comically simple’google’s virtual reality viewer is ‘comically s

google’s virtual reality viewer is ‘comically simple’google’s virtual reality viewer is ‘comically simple’google’s virtual reality viewer is ‘comically simple’ - cardboard watch box

by:SAFEKA      2019-08-23
google’s virtual reality viewer is ‘comically simple’google’s virtual reality viewer is ‘comically simple’google’s virtual reality viewer is ‘comically simple’  -  cardboard watch box
SAN FRANCISCO —
Google sees the future, with cardboard boxes everywhere.
At Google's I/O developer conference on Thursday, the search giant announced several programs designed to showcase its virtual reality browser Cardboard. In this growing online world, people can watch 3-D.
Google has launched a virtual reality browser.
A carton with some lenses and magnets that look a lot like a plastic ViewMaster toy —
As a gift at last year's I/O conference.
The idea is to create a cheap VR device that allows anyone with a smartphone to do something like fly over Google Earth map in Chicago or view a 3D personal picture.
It's a funny simple device: the smartphone slides into the front, so it's only a few inches away from the user's eyes.
Viewed through a pair of cheap plastic lenses, the image on the screen of the phone takes 3-D.
About $4.
Google's typical practice is to put the specifications of the cardboard online so that fans and manufacturers can make the cardboard.
In the year since then, the audience has been made with foam, aluminum and walnuts, and the cardboard app has been downloaded about 1 million times.
"We want the audience to be as stupid as possible and as cheap as possible because we basically want to open up virtual reality for everyone," said David Coz, an engineer at Google's Paris office who developed cardboard.
At this year's I/O conference, Google is doubling its efforts to expand virtual reality to as many phones as possible.
The first is a new software suite that will make it easier for developers to build cardboard applications for the iphone.
The company has also redesigned cardboard hardware so that it is easier to fold and can now accommodate any smartphone, including popular, larger smartphonesscreen, so-Called phablets.
Compared to product splash from previous Google meetings, the cardboard update is a gentle product that includes spherical entertainment systems and Google glasses that have never been released
Computer glasses that caused major privacy issues have been widely publicized and have now been discontinued.
Google's virtual reality is made of cardboard with low cost and simple decoration.
But, like Google's other efforts, such as free Android software, which is the most widely used operating system in the world, it seems to be more about attracting viewers than making money.
In the past year, Google has developed a 360-
The degree camera that looks like a chandelier is equipped with 16 GoPro video recorders, and there are currently about a dozen shooting spots around the world.
When running through Google's software and processor, the video will turn into a virtual reality rendering that tries to simulate the view from the human eye.
Google says it will allow people to start uploading VR videos to YouTube this summer.
In a recent demonstration at Google's Mountain View, California, campus, Clay
Google's president of virtual reality product management showed a courtyard video from Washington University.
The video feels like an immersive version of the company's Street View map product that shows the street
A horizontal view of city streets and historic sites.
Over time, the company wants this real
The live version of virtual reality will develop into a large number of videos and experiences, similar to the way YouTube videos are now shared.
Google also said on Thursday it has partnered with GoPro to develop a virtual reality recorder that anyone can buy.
The companies do not list the price of the recorder, but given that it has 16 cameras for $400 each, it could be expensive.
Anyone can guess any of these.
One might imagine the video from the front row of the concert or the TV channel at 3-D.
At the same time, it may be remembered that Google has a history of announcing new products and initiatives like Google Glass that have failed.
For decades, virtual reality has been the next big thing that never really happened.
Now, companies like Facebook, Sony and Microsoft are betting heavily on virtual reality.
The World version generated, as well as augmented reality or AR, where real-
Computers enhance the experience of the world
The generated image.
Video games will become the first app, analysts expect.
But from business meetings to doctor appointments, virtual reality experiences can appear in all things in a timely manner, they say.
Facebook Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg has repeatedly said he thinks virtual reality could be the next computing platform.
That belief is enough to drive significant investment.
In addition to the virtual reality video planned to be played on YouTube, Google is also using cardboard devices in its growing educational efforts.
In the past year, the company has conducted a trial called Adventure in about 100 classrooms, where teachers can use viewers to take students to visit websites around the world.
Last year, Google invested $0. 542 billion in Magic Leap in Florida, which is developing augmented reality technology to create imaginative images like an elephant.
Bavor said that the company has made a "significant investment" in the virtual reality field, which is far beyond the efforts on I/O.
He won't say how much money he has or how much he's full-
Employees at the time were working on these efforts, but virtual reality has grown to occupy a small building in Google's huge Mountain View campus.
"The result is that we have invested a lot in virtual reality and the whole space, far beyond the cardboard," said Bavor . ". "This reality-
It's been a year since the capture system and the amazing software powered it --
Long-term investment, this is just one of the many things we are brewing.
New York Times News office-San Francisco
Google sees the future, with cardboard boxes everywhere.
At Google's I/O developer conference on Thursday, the search giant announced several programs designed to showcase its virtual reality browser Cardboard. In this growing online world, people can watch 3-D.
Google has launched a virtual reality browser.
A carton with some lenses and magnets that look a lot like a plastic ViewMaster toy —
As a gift at last year's I/O conference.
The idea is to create a cheap VR device that allows anyone with a smartphone to do something like fly over Google Earth map in Chicago or view a 3D personal picture.
It's a funny simple device: the smartphone slides into the front, so it's only a few inches away from the user's eyes.
Viewed through a pair of cheap plastic lenses, the image on the screen of the phone takes 3-D.
About $4.
Google's typical practice is to put the specifications of the cardboard online so that fans and manufacturers can make the cardboard.
In the year since then, the audience has been made with foam, aluminum and walnuts, and the cardboard app has been downloaded about 1 million times.
"We want the audience to be as stupid as possible and as cheap as possible because we basically want to open up virtual reality for everyone," said David Coz, an engineer at Google's Paris office who developed cardboard.
At this year's I/O conference, Google is doubling its efforts to expand virtual reality to as many phones as possible.
The first is a new software suite that will make it easier for developers to build cardboard applications for the iphone.
The company has also redesigned cardboard hardware so that it is easier to fold and can now accommodate any smartphone, including popular, larger smartphonesscreen, so-Called phablets.
Compared to product splash from previous Google meetings, the cardboard update is a gentle product that includes spherical entertainment systems and Google glasses that have never been released
Computer glasses that caused major privacy issues have been widely publicized and have now been discontinued.
Google's virtual reality is made of cardboard with low cost and simple decoration.
But, like Google's other efforts, such as free Android software, which is the most widely used operating system in the world, it seems to be more about attracting viewers than making money.
In the past year, Google has developed a 360-
The degree camera that looks like a chandelier is equipped with 16 GoPro video recorders, and there are currently about a dozen shooting spots around the world.
When running through Google's software and processor, the video will turn into a virtual reality rendering that tries to simulate the view from the human eye.
Google says it will allow people to start uploading VR videos to YouTube this summer.
In a recent demonstration at Google's Mountain View, California, campus, Clay
Google's president of virtual reality product management showed a courtyard video from Washington University.
The video feels like an immersive version of the company's Street View map product that shows the street
A horizontal view of city streets and historic sites.
Over time, the company wants this real
The live version of virtual reality will develop into a large number of videos and experiences, similar to the way YouTube videos are now shared.
Google also said on Thursday it has partnered with GoPro to develop a virtual reality recorder that anyone can buy.
The companies do not list the price of the recorder, but given that it has 16 cameras for $400 each, it could be expensive.
Anyone can guess any of these.
One might imagine the video from the front row of the concert or the TV channel at 3-D.
At the same time, it may be remembered that Google has a history of announcing new products and initiatives like Google Glass that have failed.
For decades, virtual reality has been the next big thing that never really happened.
Now, companies like Facebook, Sony and Microsoft are betting heavily on virtual reality.
The World version generated, as well as augmented reality or AR, where real-
Computers enhance the experience of the world
The generated image.
Video games will become the first app, analysts expect.
But from business meetings to doctor appointments, virtual reality experiences can appear in all things in a timely manner, they say.
Facebook Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg has repeatedly said he thinks virtual reality could be the next computing platform.
That belief is enough to drive significant investment.
In addition to the virtual reality video planned to be played on YouTube, Google is also using cardboard devices in its growing educational efforts.
In the past year, the company has conducted a trial called Adventure in about 100 classrooms, where teachers can use viewers to take students to visit websites around the world.
Last year, Google invested $0. 542 billion in Magic Leap in Florida, which is developing augmented reality technology to create imaginative images like an elephant.
Bavor said that the company has made a "significant investment" in the virtual reality field, which is far beyond the efforts on I/O.
He won't say how much money he has or how much he's full-
Employees at the time were working on these efforts, but virtual reality has grown to occupy a small building in Google's huge Mountain View campus.
"The result is that we have invested a lot in virtual reality and the whole space, far beyond the cardboard," said Bavor . ". "This reality-
It's been a year since the capture system and the amazing software powered it --
Long-term investment, this is just one of the many things we are brewing.
New York Times News office-San Francisco
Google sees the future, with cardboard boxes everywhere.
At Google's I/O developer conference on Thursday, the search giant announced several programs designed to showcase its virtual reality browser Cardboard. In this growing online world, people can watch 3-D.
Google has launched a virtual reality browser.
A carton with some lenses and magnets that look a lot like a plastic ViewMaster toy —
As a gift at last year's I/O conference.
The idea is to create a cheap VR device that allows anyone with a smartphone to do something like fly over Google Earth map in Chicago or view a 3D personal picture.
It's a funny simple device: the smartphone slides into the front, so it's only a few inches away from the user's eyes.
Viewed through a pair of cheap plastic lenses, the image on the screen of the phone takes 3-D.
About $4.
Google's typical practice is to put the specifications of the cardboard online so that fans and manufacturers can make the cardboard.
In the year since then, the audience has been made with foam, aluminum and walnuts, and the cardboard app has been downloaded about 1 million times.
"We want the audience to be as stupid as possible and as cheap as possible because we basically want to open up virtual reality for everyone," said David Coz, an engineer at Google's Paris office who developed cardboard.
At this year's I/O conference, Google is doubling its efforts to expand virtual reality to as many phones as possible.
The first is a new software suite that will make it easier for developers to build cardboard applications for the iphone.
The company has also redesigned cardboard hardware so that it is easier to fold and can now accommodate any smartphone, including popular, larger smartphonesscreen, so-Called phablets.
Compared to product splash from previous Google meetings, the cardboard update is a gentle product that includes spherical entertainment systems and Google glasses that have never been released
Computer glasses that caused major privacy issues have been widely publicized and have now been discontinued.
Google's virtual reality is made of cardboard with low cost and simple decoration.
But, like Google's other efforts, such as free Android software, which is the most widely used operating system in the world, it seems to be more about attracting viewers than making money.
In the past year, Google has developed a 360-
The degree camera that looks like a chandelier is equipped with 16 GoPro video recorders, and there are currently about a dozen shooting spots around the world.
When running through Google's software and processor, the video will turn into a virtual reality rendering that tries to simulate the view from the human eye.
Google says it will allow people to start uploading VR videos to YouTube this summer.
In a recent demonstration at Google's Mountain View, California, campus, Clay
Google's president of virtual reality product management showed a courtyard video from Washington University.
The video feels like an immersive version of the company's Street View map product that shows the street
A horizontal view of city streets and historic sites.
Over time, the company wants this real
The live version of virtual reality will develop into a large number of videos and experiences, similar to the way YouTube videos are now shared.
Google also said on Thursday it has partnered with GoPro to develop a virtual reality recorder that anyone can buy.
The companies do not list the price of the recorder, but given that it has 16 cameras for $400 each, it could be expensive.
Anyone can guess any of these.
One might imagine the video from the front row of the concert or the TV channel at 3-D.
At the same time, it may be remembered that Google has a history of announcing new products and initiatives like Google Glass that have failed.
For decades, virtual reality has been the next big thing that never really happened.
Now, companies like Facebook, Sony and Microsoft are betting heavily on virtual reality.
The World version generated, as well as augmented reality or AR, where real-
Computers enhance the experience of the world
The generated image.
Video games will become the first app, analysts expect.
But from business meetings to doctor appointments, virtual reality experiences can appear in all things in a timely manner, they say.
Facebook Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg has repeatedly said he thinks virtual reality could be the next computing platform.
That belief is enough to drive significant investment.
In addition to the virtual reality video planned to be played on YouTube, Google is also using cardboard devices in its growing educational efforts.
In the past year, the company has conducted a trial called Adventure in about 100 classrooms, where teachers can use viewers to take students to visit websites around the world.
Last year, Google invested $0. 542 billion in Magic Leap in Florida, which is developing augmented reality technology to create imaginative images like an elephant.
Bavor said that the company has made a "significant investment" in the virtual reality field, which is far beyond the efforts on I/O.
He won't say how much money he has or how much he's full-
Employees at the time were working on these efforts, but virtual reality has grown to occupy a small building in Google's huge Mountain View campus.
"The result is that we have invested a lot in virtual reality and the whole space, far beyond the cardboard," said Bavor . ". "This reality-
It's been a year since the capture system and the amazing software powered it --
Long-term investment, this is just one of the many things we are brewing.
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